Cover 2 Cover Magazine May 2011 : Page 28

BEAUTY & STYLE Before After Before After Guidelines for a Safe, Great Permanent Makeup It’s one of those mornings where you’re run-ning late. Wouldn’t it be great to have your makeup on already? The good news is that “wash & wear” makeup is a reality. Today’s cosmetic tattooing allows women, and even some men, to permanently enhance the color or shape of their eyebrows, eyeliner, or lips. permanent cosmetics. To choose a competent professional, follow these guidelines before getting a procedure: by Dr. Laura Reed, OD, CPCP There Should Be A Health Permit States have different health department require-ments for cosmetic tattooing, so investigate Facial cosmetic tattooing is called permanent your state’s regulations. For example, California cosmetic makeup or micropigmentation. The has no state-wide inspection laws for perma-procedures are performed using various meth-nent makeup technicians. Regulations vary by ods to deposit colored pigments into the skin city, so the safety net is a county health permit. so it won’t wash or smear off. If you’re a candi-A permit is issued only if a technician passes date, it can be a natural looking alternative to an annual inspection. Why is this important? Even when sterile needles are used, disease your daily makeup routine. transmission can occur between people through Permanent makeup offers convenience and ben-cross-contamination. Permanent makeup is efits, but use caution when selecting your tat-invasive and few tattoo artists have medical tooist: Most states don’t require a professional backgrounds, so health permits are “safety in-license for permanent cosmetics. They require surance.” Inspectors ensure the tattooing equip-other professionals (doctors, nurses, cosmetolo-ment is legal and safe, sterilization equipment is gists) to have formal education and testing for working, and correct disinfection methods are initial licensing, then continuing education for used. renewals. But the same rules do not apply to To read the entire article, click here. 28 Cover 2 Cover Magazine | May 2011

Guidelines for a Safe, Great Permanent Makeup

Dr. Laura Reed

It’s one of those mornings where you’re running late. Wouldn’t it be great to have your makeup on already? The good news is that “wash & wear” makeup is a reality. Today’s cosmetic tattooing allows women, and even some men, to permanently enhance the color or shape of their eyebrows, eyeliner, or lips. <br /> <br /> Facial cosmetic tattooing is called permanent cosmetic makeup or micropigmentation. The procedures are performed using various methods to deposit colored pigments into the skin so it won’t wash or smear off. If you’re a candidate, it can be a natural looking alternative to your daily makeup routine.<br /> <br /> Permanent makeup offers convenience and benefits, but use caution when selecting your tattooist: Most states don’t require a professional license for permanent cosmetics. They require other professionals (doctors, nurses, cosmetologists) to have formal education and testing for initial licensing, then continuing education for renewals. But the same rules do not apply to permanent cosmetics.<br /> <br /> To choose a competent professional, follow these guidelines before getting a procedure: <br /> <br /> There Should Be A Health Permit<br /> States have different health department requirements for cosmetic tattooing, so investigate your state’s regulations. For example, California has no state-wide inspection laws for permanent makeup technicians. Regulations vary by city, so the safety net is a county health permit. A permit is issued only if a technician passes an annual inspection. Why is this important? Even when sterile needles are used, disease transmission can occur between people through cross-contamination. Permanent makeup is invasive and few tattoo artists have medical backgrounds, so health permits are “safety insurance.” Inspectors ensure the tattooing equipment is legal and safe, sterilization equipment is working, and correct disinfection methods are used. <br /> <br /> The technician should be certified by a national association<br /> Since permanent cosmetic “licenses” basically don’t exist, ask questions if a technician claims to be “licensed” or “certified.” Ask if she’s licensed by your state as an esthetician, manicurist, etc. Defining certification is trickier. Most technicians have certificates given by trainers for completing a basic course or advanced class. So she might use those papers to call herself “certified.” But key differences exist between training certificates and industry-based certifications: <br /> <br /> Professional industry certifications help ensure quality and safety. They require the passing of an examination by a national professional society. The Society of Permanent Cosmetic Professionals (SPCP) administers a standardized exam testing knowledge and competencies in permanent cosmetics and infection control. If passed, the title Certified Permanent Cosmetic Professional (CPCP) can be used. Continuing education and blood-borne pathogens classes are required to renew the CPCP designation. Similarly, the American Academy of Micropigmentation (AAM) offers a board exam. If passed, a technician can use the distinction of Fellow (FAAM). <br /> <br /> Schedule a consultation<br /> Once you’ve verified that a technician has a health permit and industry certification, visit her business and meet her in person. Continue your evaluation: <br /> •Her office should be clean and organized with a separate procedure room and health permit displayed. <br /> •Look at her portfolio. Color and appearance of permanent makeup changes after healing, so you should see “Before”, “Immediately After”, and “Healed” photos. Look at her makeup artistry—the shape, placement, and color of her work are as important as infection control practices. <br /> •Ask about experience. How long has she been tattooing and how many procedures are done routinely? If her menu of services is extensive (facials, waxing, hair extensions, etc.), her skills may not be on par with someone doing cosmetic tattooing full time. <br /> <br /> Don’t choose on price alone<br /> Today budgets are tight, but going for the lowest price can be a mistake. This is an investment in your face and it’s permanent. Aren’t you worth spending a little more to protect your health and look great? <br />

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